New REGD and Themes Courses Approved by Panel

Body

Please see below for courses approved for either the Foundation: Race, Ethnicity and Gender Diversity or one of the GE: Themes categories. This page is updated as courses are approved by the Office of the University Registrar.

For details about a specific course, please visit ascnet.osu.edu to learn more. 

(Last Updated: 11/16/2021) 

Advanced

Accordion Header
ASCC Race, Ethnic and Gender Diversity Panel

Text
  • AFAMAST 2201 "Major Readings in African American and African Studies: 
    • An introduction to major authors and texts contributing to the discourses that have shaped and defined African American and African Studies from its inception to the present.
  • ARTEDUC 2600 "Visual Culture: Investigating Diversity & Social Justice" 
    • A study of the artists, the artworks, and art worlds from diverse ethnic cultures in North America. This course will develop students’ skills in writing, reading, critical thinking, and oral expression and foster an understanding of the pluralistic nature of institutions, society, and culture(s) of the United States.
  • ARTEDUC 2600H "Visual Culture: Investigating Diversity & Social Justice"
    • A study of the artists, the artworks, and art worlds from diverse ethnic cultures in North America. This course will develop students’ skills in writing, reading, critical thinking, and oral expression and foster an understanding of the pluralistic nature of institutions, society, and culture(s) of the United States. Honors version. 
  • ARTEDUC 2700 "Criticizing Television
    • A critical analysis of a wide variety of television programs through viewing, discussing, reading, and writing. Students will focus on the ways in which racial, ethnic, and gender diversity issues are represented on television.
  • ENGLISH 2282 "Introduction to Queer Studies"
    • Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class, and nationality.
  • ENGLISH 2581 "Introduction to U.S. Ethnic Literatures and Cultures" 
    • This course provides a broad survey of literature produced by and about the major racial groups in the United States, examining how social movements of the 1960s and 70s led to the emergence of ethnic studies in higher education and how the literature addresses a wide range of historical events and political processes that have constructed racial differences and hierarchies in the U.S. 
  • HISTART 3605 "East West Photography" 
    • Investigation of social relations and how they are constructed by photographs with a particular focus on interactions between North America, Asia, and Europe.
  • HISTORY 2455 "Jews in American Film"
    • ​​​​​​​A study of how modern Jews appear in film compared with historical reality.
  • JEWSHST 2455 "Jews in American Film" 
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​A study of how modern Jews appear in film compared with historical reality.
  • SOCIOL 2463 "Social Inequality: Race, Class, and Gender
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​The study of social inequality with a focus on inequalities by race/ethnicity, gender, and class.
  • SOCWORK 1140 "Issues in Social Justice: Race, Gender and Sexuality
    • Examines the history of social oppression directed at certain minority populations in the United States and its impact on their current opportunities and lived experiences. The primary purpose is to analyze how racism, sexism, heterosexism and institutionalized discrimination based on ethnicity affect the social welfare and well-being of those living in the United States.
  • THEATRE 2700 "Criticizing Television" 
    • A critical analysis of a wide variety of television programs through viewing, discussing, reading, and writing. Students will focus on the ways in which racial, ethnic, and gender diversity issues are represented on television.
  • WGSST 1110 "Gender, Sex and Power" 
    • Introduces students to the study of gender, sex, and power. We will draw on a variety of literatures to analyze gender, race, sexuality, and other identities. We will place the study of U.S. women in broader transnational contexts.
  • WGSST 2215 "Reading Women Writers
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Study of women writers' strategies for articulating experiences and using literature as a lens for social reality and catalyst for social and political change.
  • WGSST 2260 "Queer Ecologies: Gender, Sexuality, & the Environment" 
    • Queer ecologies seek to disrupt the gendered and heterosexual assumptions embedded in how we understand the environment, nature, and bodies (human and animal). From animal studies, queer and feminist social movements for environmental justice, trans*natures, and sexual politics, Queer Ecologies will articulate a commitment to new thinking about the challenges of planetary and climate change.
  • WGSST 2282 "Introduction to Queer Studies"
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class, and nationality.
  • WGSST 2306 "Girlhood" 
    • An examination of the contemporary contexts and social differences of female adolescence, including race, ethnicity, location, sexuality, class.

Accordion Header
ASCC Themes Panel

Text
  • ENGLISH 2276 "Arts of Persuasion" 
    • Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media, and cultural contexts.
  • ENGLISH 3110 "Citizenship, Justice, and Diversity in Literatures, Cultures, and Media"
    • Since the beginning of the modern nation state, cultural texts (poems, novels, films, pamphlets, zines, short stories, advertisements, comics, etc.) have been the essential medium through which the discourse of citizenship has been developed, constructed, refined, and debated. In this course student examine a range of literary periods, genres, and media focused on citizenship and social justice.
  • ENGLISH 3264 "Monsters Without and Within
    • Storytellers have long used monsters not only to frighten us but also to jolt us into thinking deeply about ourselves, others, and the world we live in. This course examines how various horror genres use monsters to explore issues of wellbeing and citizenship, and debates about race, gender, sexual orientation, mental health, social justice, and personal responsibility.
  • ENGLISH 3395 "Literature and Leadership
    • In this course students consider leadership as a component of national citizenship and literature as a mode of exploring and analyzing a range of perspectives on leadership. The course will encourage students to think about how responses to power are mediated by race, gender, and class and how literary study can help them reflect on and articulate their own leadership strengths and aspirations.
  • GERMAN 3252.01 "The Holocaust in German Literature and Film" 
    • ​​​​​​​This course will provide an overview of the historical events we call the Holocaust, including their pre-history and their aftermath. This information will provide the necessary background for discussing some of the questions that have occupied the fields of philosophy, literature, aesthetics, and ethics over the last sixty years. Taught in English.
  • GERMAN 3252.02 "The Holocaust in German Literature and Film
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​German 3252.02 is an online version of German 3252.01. This course will provide an overview of the historical events we call the Holocaust, including their pre-history and aftermath. This information will provide the necessary background for discussing some of the questions that have occupied the fields of philosophy, literature, aesthetics, and ethics over the last sixty years. Taught in English.
  • GERMAN 3254H "Representations and Memory of the Holocaust in Film" 
    • Students will view, discuss, and examine major filmic representations of the Holocaust from several countries from the 1940s through the present. Students will learn how these films have contributed to our understanding of its events, challenged notions of social responsibility and belonging, and coped with the problem of representing something often considered unrepresentable. Taught in English.
  • HISTORY 3680 "Religion and Law in Comparative Perspective"
    • Comparative, interdisciplinary approach to studying religion and law. Drawing on concrete cases, historical studies, and theoretical literature, the course explores how the relationship between religion and law has been configured differently in different liberal democracies, such as the U.S., France, and Israel, and what this might mean for contemporary debates. Cross-listed with RELSTDS 3680. 
  • INTSTDS 3450 "Human Rights: An Introduction
    • ​​​​​​​Provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the conceptual history as well as the practice of human rights and its connection to global and domestic citizenship. It traces the evolution of the concept of rights, which emerges from modern revolutions and expands citizenship rights around the world, and explores how these events are connected with the emergence of global conceptions of rights.
  • RELSTDS 3680 "Religion and Law in Comparative Perspective"
    • ​​​​​​​Comparative, interdisciplinary approach to studying religion and law. Drawing on concrete cases, historical studies, and theoretical literature, the course explores how the relationship between religion and law has been configured differently in different liberal democracies, such as the U.S., France, and Israel, and what this might mean for contemporary debates. Cross-listed with HISTORY 3680. 
Text
  • ENGLISH 3360 "Ecopoetics
    • 'Ecopoetics' is a thematic literature course focused on interpretation and analysis of literary texts that represent interactions between humans and the natural world within specific cultural and historical settings, through a contextual examination of how human activity has impacted the environment, how social and natural systems interact, and the long-term impact of human choices.
  • FRENCH 2803.01 "Paris" 
    • Exploration of the lived environment of the city of Paris through the study of its history, geography, population, and cultural production, including but not limited to art, architecture, cinema, literature, and fashion.
Text
  • ANTHROP 4597.03H "The Prehistory of Environment and Climate
    • History of modern biotic communities, biological evidence of climatic change during the late glacial and Holocene, and exploration of the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to climatic functions.
Text
  • COMM 3442 "Violence in Society and Violence in the Media"
    • This course examines the causes, consequences, and solutions to human aggression and violence. It discusses how aggression and violence are defined and measured, aggression theories, individual risk factors, contextual risk factors, protective factors, and aggression targets. It examines in detail violent media research. It also discusses how to reduce anger, aggression, and violent media effects.
  • ENGLISH 3264 "Monsters Without and Within
    • Storytellers have long used monsters not only to frighten us but also to jolt us into thinking deeply about ourselves, others, and the world we live in. This course examines how various horror genres use monsters to explore issues of wellbeing and citizenship, and debates about race, gender, sexual orientation, mental health, social justice, and personal responsibility.