New REGD and Themes Courses Approved

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Please see below for courses approved for either the Foundation: Race, Ethnicity and Gender Diversity or one of the GE: Themes categories. This page is updated as courses are approved by the Office of the University Registrar.

For details about a specific course, please visit ascnet.osu.edu to learn more. 

(Last Updated: 02/06/2023) 

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ASCC Race, Ethnicity and Gender Diversity Panel

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  • AFAMAST 1101 "Introduction to African American and African Studies"
    • Introduction to the scholarly study of the Africana experience, focusing on patterns of resistance, adaptation, diversity, and transnational connections.
  • AFAMAST 1112 "Introduction to the Black World
    • This course introduces students to the history & present of the global Black World(s) encompassing Africa & its diasporas. It explores the racial ideologies that shaped Blackness, & looks to its political, cultural, social, & religious expressions. Students discuss Black movements, diversity, & anti-black politics. They learn to look at lived realities of blackness through an intersectional lens.
  • AFAMAST 2201 "Major Readings in African American and African Studies"
    • An introduction to major authors and texts contributing to the discourses that have shaped and defined African American and African Studies from its inception to the present.
  • AFAMAST 2218 "Black Urban Experience
    • Examination of contemporary black urban experience focused on the impact of persistent residential segregation, increasing class polarization, and the global force of hip hop culture.
  • AFAMAST 2270 "Introduction to Black Popular Culture"
    • A critical analysis of the commodity production and consumption of black popular culture products, such as fashion, film, urban fiction, music, vernacular expression, television and advertising.
  • AFAMAST 2281 "Introduction to African-American Literature"
    • A study of representative literary works by African-American writers from 1760 to the present. Cross-listed with ENGLISH 2281. 
  • AFAMAST 2367.04 "Black Women Writers: Text and Context"
    • Writing and analysis of black women's literary representations of issues in United States social history. Cross-listed with WGSST 2367.04.
  • ANTHROP 1101 "Archaeology and Human Diversity, Lessons from the Past
    • Examines how power relations shaped racial, ethnic, and gender identities in ancient societies by examining archaeological sites like Tutankhamen's tomb, Stonehenge, Machu Pichu, and Great Zimbabwe and shows how these and other sites have been misrepresented in the media and misused by governments to promote racism and inequality.
  • ANTHROP 2210 "Race, Ethnicity, Gender Diversity, and Human Biology"
    • Focuses on the history of pseudoscience in the biological study of race, ethnicity, gender diversity, and human sexuality; evaluates modern scientific studies relating to human biological diversity.
  • ARTEDUC 2600 "Visual Culture: Investigating Diversity & Social Justice" 
    • A study of the artists, the artworks, and art worlds from diverse ethnic cultures in North America. This course will develop students’ skills in writing, reading, critical thinking, and oral expression and foster an understanding of the pluralistic nature of institutions, society, and culture(s) of the United States. Cross-listed with THEATRE 2700.
  • ARTEDUC 2600H "Visual Culture: Investigating Diversity & Social Justice"
    • A study of the artists, the artworks, and art worlds from diverse ethnic cultures in North America. This course will develop students’ skills in writing, reading, critical thinking, and oral expression and foster an understanding of the pluralistic nature of institutions, society, and culture(s) of the United States. Honors version. 
  • ARTEDUC 2700 "Criticizing Television
    • A critical analysis of a wide variety of television programs through viewing, discussing, reading, and writing. Students will focus on the ways in which racial, ethnic, and gender diversity issues are represented on television.
  • CLAS 3215 "Sex and Gender in the Ancient World"
    • Introductory survey of women, gender, and sexual relations in the ancient Mediterranean world, especially Greece and Rome. Cross-listed with HISTORY 3215.
  • COMPSTD 1100 "Intro to the Humanities: Cross-Cultural Perspectives"
    • This introductory course is designed to survey some of the current preoccupations in the Humanities, especially as they relate to culture, power, and identity. Instructors of 1100 seek to present relevant issues in comparative cultural study, employing a mix of cultural theory, current events, and literature, visual, and performing arts with a focus on race, ethnicity, and gender.
  • COMPSTD 1100H "Intro to the Humanities: Cross-Cultural Perspectives"
    • This introductory course is designed to survey some of the current preoccupations in the Humanities, especially as they relate to culture, power, and identity. Instructors of 1100 seek to present relevant issues in comparative cultural study, employing a mix of cultural theory, current events, and literature, visual, and performing arts with a focus on race, ethnicity, and gender. Honors version.
  • COMPSTD 2264 "Introduction to Popular Cultures"
    • ​​​​​​​This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Popular Culture Studies through a variety of methods and case studies. The specific focus will be on the entanglement of race, ethnicity, and gender in popular cultures. Cross-listed with ENGLISH 2264.
  • COMPSTD 2301 "Introduction to World Literature"
    • Analysis of oral and written literatures of diverse cultures and historical periods.
  • COMPSTD 2322 "Introduction to Latinx Studies"
    • Introduction to Latinx studies; history, politics, and cultural production of Latinx communities in the U.S. and its borderlands. Cross-listed with SPANISH 2242.
  • COMPSTD 2350 "Introduction to Folklore" 
    • A general study of the field of folklore including basic approaches and a survey of primary folk materials: folktales, legends, folksongs, ballads, and folk beliefs. Cross-listed with ENGLISH 2270. 
  • COMPSTD 2350H "Introduction to Folklore" 
    • A general study of the field of folklore including basic approaches and a survey of primary folk materials: folktales, legends, folksongs, ballads, and folk beliefs. Honors version. Cross-listed with ENGLISH 2270H.
  • COMPSTD 2381 "Race, Ethnicity & Gender in Spanish Speaking Film & TV"
    • This course will examine how cinema and television in Latin America, the US, and Spain reflect issues of race, ethnicity, and gender and reveal social attitudes and prejudices. Cross-listed with SPANISH 2381 and WGSS 2381.
  • COMPSTD 2995 "Race and Gender in Eastern Europe and the US: A Transatlantic Comparison" 
    • By studying how identities (racial, ethnic, gender, and religious) exist as cultural constructs, this course will examine and compare the experiences of Russian and East European ethnic and racial minorities in their respective countries and African Americans in the US regarding racialization and marginalization through cultural and social constructs. Cross-listed with SLAVIC 2995.99. 
  • CRPLAN 3510 "Crime, Safety, and the Urban Environment"
    • Crime and public safety are critical issues which are essential to the health and vitality of neighborhoods. CRP 3510 explores the intersection of the built environment, neighborhood design, city planning, structural discrimination and identity in influencing exposure to crime or violence and perceptions of safety.
  • DANCE 2500 "Introduction to Anti-Racism in the Performing Arts"
    • Builds a foundation for anti-racist reflection and practice for artists, educators, audiences, all who participate in creating and upholding cultural values; addresses how racism operates systemically, institutionally, and interpersonally in live and digital performing arts. Considers personal biases / identities, relationships between culture / society in perpetrating or interrupting oppression.
  • EDUTL 3005 "Urban Teaching and Learning
    • This course introduces students to issues related to teaching and learning in urban school contexts.
  • EDUTL 3368 "Black Voices Matter: Resisting Anti-Blackness via Black Youth Literature and Media
    • This course introduces intersectionality as an analytical framework for engaging literature, media, arts, etc., written about/for Black Youth by focusing on a broad body of children's and youth literature that also reflects how aspects of a person's social and political identities, including gender, and ethnicity, combine to create different modes of discrimination and privilege.
  • ENGLISH 2176 "Rhetorics of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender
    • In this course students study the basic elements of rhetoric and rhetorical representations of various historically constituted categories, including race, gender, and ethnicity, and use rhetoric as a lens for examining messages about race, gender, and ethnicity. Students analyze the ways that these categories are rhetorically constructed and the material consequences of those constructions.
  • ENGLISH 2221 "Introduction to Shakespeare, Race, and Gender
    • This course explores the historical roots of our ideas about race and gender by way of Shakespeare and the culture in which he wrote. Students will learn how Shakespeare's formulations of issues of race and gender are products of a time when both categories were undergoing significant conceptual development and how Shakespeare's ways of imagining this turbulence continues to resonate today.
  • ENGLISH 2264 "Introduction to Popular Cultures"
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Popular Culture Studies through a variety of methods and case studies. The specific focus will be on the entanglement of race, ethnicity, and gender in popular cultures. Cross-listed with COMPSTD 2264.
  • ENGLISH 2270 "Introduction to Folklore" 
    • A general study of the field of folklore including basic approaches and a survey of primary folk materials: folktales, legends, folksongs, ballads, and folk beliefs. Cross-listed with COMPSTD 2350. 
  • ENGLISH 2270H "Introduction to Folklore" 
    • A general study of the field of folklore including basic approaches and a survey of primary folk materials: folktales, legends, folksongs, ballads, and folk beliefs. Honors version. Cross-listed with COMPSTD 2350H. 
  • ENGLISH 2281 "Introduction to African-American Literature
    • A study of representative literary works by African-American writers from 1760 to the present. Cross-listed with AFAMAST 2281. 
  • ENGLISH 2282 "Introduction to Queer Studies"
    • Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class, and nationality. Cross-listed with WGSST 2282.
  • ENGLISH 2381 "Introduction to the Black Atlantic"
    • The term 'Black Atlantic' describes encounters between Africans, Europeans, and Americans that have shaped our modern world: its politics, its literature, its art, and its economics. This class examines the literature of these encounters and relevant media in visual art and cinema depicting enslavement of Africans and resistance to slavery, racism, and the politics of white supremacy.
  • ENGLISH 2581 "Introduction to U.S. Ethnic Literatures and Cultures
    • This course provides a broad survey of literature produced by and about the major racial groups in the United States, examining how social movements of the 1960s and 70s led to the emergence of ethnic studies in higher education and how the literature addresses a wide range of historical events and political processes that have constructed racial differences and hierarchies in the U.S. 
  • ESHESA 2577 "Diversity and Social Justice in Leadership"
    • Builds on intellectual and experiential engagement with issues of difference, diversity, social justice, and alliance-building, with a particular emphasis on race, ethnicity, and gender.
  • ESPHE 3206 "School and Society
    • Use of concepts and methods of history, philosophy and the social sciences to grasp the interrelationship between a diverse society and education.
  • HDFS 3440 "Human Sexuality and Intersectionality Across the Lifespan
    • This course will examine, through a multidisciplinary perspective, the ways in which race, ethnicity, and gender diversity influence the lens in which we view, study, and experience human sexuality across the lifespan.
  • HEBREW 3704 "Women in the Bible and Beyond
    • An examination of the social, legal, and religious position of women as they appear in the Hebrew Bible and the ways in which they have been represented and interpreted in later textual, visual, and audio sources. Cross-listed with JEWSHST 3704.
  • HISTART 3010 "Gender and Sexuality in Western Art"
    • This course offers an introduction to the intersectional study of European Art, exploring the intertwining ideologies of gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity from the Ancient Mediterranean World to the Twentieth Century.
  • HISTART 3010H "Gender and Sexuality in Western Art"
    • This course offers an introduction to the intersectional study of European Art, exploring the intertwining ideologies of gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity from the Ancient Mediterranean World to the Twentieth Century. Honors version.
  • HISTART 3605 "East West Photography" 
    • Investigation of social relations and how they are constructed by photographs with a particular focus on interactions between North America, Asia, and Europe.
  • HISTORY 2455 "Jews in American Film"
    • A study of how modern Jews appear in film compared with historical reality.
  • HISTORY 2620 "Women Changing the World: Histories of Activism and Struggle"
    • History of women's activism in global perspective.
  • HISTORY 3215 "Sex and Gender in the Ancient World"
    • ​​​​​​​Introductory survey of women, gender, and sexual relations in the ancient Mediterranean world, especially Greece and Rome. Cross-listed with CLAS 3215.
  • HISTORY 3231 "Creating Medieval Monsters: Constructions of the 'Other'"
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​This course examines the development of a persecuting society in medieval Europe and explores the various ways that minorities were demonized (literally turned into “monsters”) in the medieval discourse and artwork in order to create a strong sense of unity within Christendom, with a specific focus on Jews, lepers, Muslims, religious non-conformists, sexual nonconformists, and women.
  • HISTORY 3620 "Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History in the United States, 1940-Present"
    • An overview of LGBT culture and history in the U.S. from 1940 to the present. Students will examine changes in LGBT lives and experiences during the last half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, as well as the intersections of race, sexuality, and class, and how these categories have affected sexual minority communities and broader US law and culture.
  • JEWSHST 2455 "Jews in American Film" 
    • A study of how modern Jews appear in film compared with historical reality.
  • JEWSHST 3704 "Women in the Bible and Beyond
    • An examination of the social, legal, and religious position of women as they appear in the Hebrew Bible and the ways in which they have been represented and interpreted in later textual, visual, and audio sources. Cross-listed with HEBREW 3704.
  • LING 3601 "Language, Race, and Ethnicity in the U.S."
    • Objective examination of the relationship between language, race and ethnicity in the context of varieties of English used by minority ethnic and racial groups in the U.S.
  • NELC 1125 "Stories of Belonging and Difference in the Middle East and South Asia
    • This course will read and analyze a variety of short stories to illuminate different cultures of the Middle East and South Asia. The goal of the course is to introduce students to diverse cultures through literature. Students will be become familiar with a variety of literary representations, social structures and religious, ethnic and racial diversity after the completion of this course.
  • PUBAFRS 2170 "Equity, Justice, and Public Service
    • Through exploration of the definitions and intersectionality of concepts including race, gender, ethnicity, and socio-economic status, this course examines how public administration management decisions and policy result - or not - in socially equitable application.
  • RELSTDS 2370 "Introduction to Comparative Religion
    • Introduction to the academic study of religion through comparison among major traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, etc.) and smaller communities.
  • RELSTDS 2370H "Introduction to Comparative Religion
    • Introduction to the academic study of religion through comparison among major traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, etc.) and smaller communities. Honors version. 
  • SASIA 2230 "Living Everyday Lives: Systems of Discrimination in the United States and South Asia"
    • The course shows how everyday life in South Asia where caste is a category of oppression compares to everyday life in the United States where race is a category of oppression. Everyday life will also introduce students to how race and caste as categories of oppression interact with gender and ethnicity in the United States and South Asia.
  • SLAVIC 2995.99 "Race and Gender in Eastern Europe and the US: A Transatlantic Comparison
    • By studying how identities (racial, ethnic, gender, and religious) exist as cultural constructs, this course will examine and compare the experiences of Russian and East European ethnic and racial minorities in their respective countries and African Americans in the US regarding racialization and marginalization through cultural and social constructs. Cross-listed with COMPSTD 2995.
  • SOCIOL 2309 "Introduction to Law and Society"
    • Introduction to the law as a social institution, including the origins of law and its relationship to other social institutions, social control, and social change.
  • SOCIOL 2463 "Social Inequality: Race, Class, and Gender
    • The study of social inequality with a focus on inequalities by race/ethnicity, gender, and class.
  • SOCWORK 1140 "Issues in Social Justice: Race, Gender and Sexuality" 
    • Examines the history of social oppression directed at certain minority populations in the United States and its impact on their current opportunities and lived experiences. The primary purpose is to analyze how racism, sexism, heterosexism and institutionalized discrimination based on ethnicity affect the social welfare and well-being of those living in the United States.
  • SPANISH 2242 "Introduction to Latinx Studies"
    • Introduction to Latinx studies; history, politics, and cultural production of Latinx communities in the U.S. and its borderlands. Cross-listed with COMPSTD 2322.
  • SPANISH 2381 "Race, Ethnicity & Gender in Spanish Speaking Film & TV"
    • This course will examine how cinema and television in Latin America, the US, and Spain reflect issues of race, ethnicity, and gender and reveal social attitudes and prejudices. Cross-listed with WGSS 2381 and COMPSTD 2381.
  • THEATRE 2700 "Criticizing Television" 
    • A critical analysis of a wide variety of television programs through viewing, discussing, reading, and writing. Students will focus on the ways in which racial, ethnic, and gender diversity issues are represented on television. Cross-listed with ARTEDUC 2700.
  • WGSST 1110 "Gender, Sex and Power" 
    • Introduces students to the study of gender, sex, and power. We will draw on a variety of literatures to analyze gender, race, sexuality, and other identities. We will place the study of U.S. women in broader transnational contexts.
  • WGSST 1110H "Gender, Sex and Power" 
    • Introduces students to the study of gender, sex, and power. We will draw on a variety of literatures to analyze gender, race, sexuality, and other identities. We will place the study of U.S. women in broader transnational contexts. Honors version.
  • WGSST 2215 "Reading Women Writers
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Study of women writers' strategies for articulating experiences and using literature as a lens for social reality and catalyst for social and political change.
  • WGSST 2230 "Gender, Sexuality, and Race in Popular Culture"
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Explores how popular culture generates and articulates our understandings of gender and sexuality and their intersections with race and class.
  • WGSST 2260 "Queer Ecologies: Gender, Sexuality, & the Environment
    • Queer ecologies seek to disrupt the gendered and heterosexual assumptions embedded in how we understand the environment, nature, and bodies (human and animal). From animal studies, queer and feminist social movements for environmental justice, trans*natures, and sexual politics, Queer Ecologies will articulate a commitment to new thinking about the challenges of planetary and climate change.
  • WGSST 2282 "Introduction to Queer Studies"
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class, and nationality. Cross-listed with ENGLISH 2282.
  • WGSST 2305 "A World of Gender and Sexualities
    • ​​​​​​​Investigates gender and sexuality in transnational and cross-cultural perspective.
  • WGSST 2306 "Girlhood"
    • ​​​​​​​An examination of the contemporary contexts and social differences of female adolescence, including race, ethnicity, location, sexuality, class. 
  • WGSST 2317 "Gender at the Movies: Hollywood and Beyond"
    • ​​​​​​​A study of the representation of gender in relationship to race, sexuality, and class in cinema. Topics may include stardom, genre, narrative, national cinemas, women and minority filmmakers, and film history.
  • WGSST 2327 "Embodying Gender, Race, and Ethnicity"
    • ​​​​​​​This course examines through a feminist lens how the body is situated, lived, interpreted, and constructed in culture. The course focuses on intersectionality as a key issue in understanding how the body’s gender, race, sexuality, health, physical abilities, and class/economic situation are interconnected.
  • WGSST 2340 "Si Se Puede: Latinx Gender Studies​​​​​​​"
    • ​​​​​​​Explores the various layers of complexity that have historically made up the Latinx experience in the United States at the intersections of class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality.
  • WGSST 2367.04 "Black Women Writers: Text and Context"
    • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Writing and analysis of black women's literary representations of issues in United States social history. Cross-listed with AFAMAST 2367.04.
  • WGSST 2400 "Higher Power: Feminisms & Religion
    • ​​​​​​​Why is studying religion important to feminism? What is religion and why should people interested in the study of feminism take it seriously? We will explore the history and current understandings of the term "religion" in different parts of the world and its relationship to feminism, and we will examine our own assumptions and previous conceptions of what religion means and what "counts." 
  • WGSST 2381 "Race, Ethnicity & Gender in Spanish Speaking Film & TV" 
    • This course will examine how cinema and television in Latin America, the US, and Spain reflect issues of race, ethnicity, and gender and reveal social attitudes and prejudices. Cross-listed with SPANISH 2381 and COMPSTD 2381.

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ASCC Themes Panel

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  • ANTHROP 5626 "More: Culture and Economic Life"
    • An analysis of economic rationality in non-market and market societies; resource allocation, work organization, product disposition, exchange, money, trade, and development.
  • COMM 2850 "Media and Citizenship"
    • This course provides an overview of media’s role in citizenship by learning about media industry operations, how media influence us, critical evaluation of media, media responsibility and literacy, and how our experiences and biases affect the current relationship between mass media and democracy. We will learn how to engage with media to promote informed, active, and responsible citizenship.
  • ENGLISH 2276 "Arts of Persuasion" 
    • Introduces students to the study and practice of rhetoric and how arguments are shaped by technology, media, and cultural contexts.
  • ENGLISH 3011.01 "Digital Activism"
    • This course is both critical and creative. Students will tinker with digital media tools and think about digital media and social change and citizenship within a rich and safe environment, investigating and experimenting with the consequences of humans' relationships with digital media; studio days will afford hands-on guidance in mobilizing digital media for the purpose of protest and activism.
  • ENGLISH 3110 "Citizenship, Justice, and Diversity in Literatures, Cultures, and Media"
    • Since the beginning of the modern nation state, cultural texts (poems, novels, films, pamphlets, zines, short stories, advertisements, comics, etc.) have been the essential medium through which the discourse of citizenship has been developed, constructed, refined, and debated. In this course student examine a range of literary periods, genres, and media focused on citizenship and social justice.
  • ENGLISH 3264 "Monsters Without and Within
    • Storytellers have long used monsters not only to frighten us but also to jolt us into thinking deeply about ourselves, others, and the world we live in. This course examines how various horror genres use monsters to explore issues of wellbeing and citizenship, and debates about race, gender, sexual orientation, mental health, social justice, and personal responsibility.
  • ENGLISH 3395 "Literature and Leadership
    • In this course students consider leadership as a component of national citizenship and literature as a mode of exploring and analyzing a range of perspectives on leadership. The course will encourage students to think about how responses to power are mediated by race, gender, and class and how literary study can help them reflect on and articulate their own leadership strengths and aspirations. 
  • FRIT 3054 "The 21st-Century Skill: Intercultural Competence for Global Citizenship"
    • In this course students will develop cultural self-awareness, intercultural empathy, and an understanding of the patterns of behavior and values of people from different cultural contexts - all skills necessary for working and succeeding in the 21st century.
  • GEOG 5502 "Data Justice and the Right to the Smart City"
    • Neoliberal governance of cities affecting cultural, civic, and environmental politics; urban geographies of difference; politics and social economy of global cities; the uneven landscape of access and opportunity; shadow governance; and the built form.
  • GERMAN 3252.01 "The Holocaust in German Literature and Film" 
    • This course will provide an overview of the historical events we call the Holocaust, including their pre-history and their aftermath. This information will provide the necessary background for discussing some of the questions that have occupied the fields of philosophy, literature, aesthetics, and ethics over the last sixty years. Taught in English.
  • GERMAN 3252.02 "The Holocaust in German Literature and Film
    • German 3252.02 is an online version of German 3252.01. This course will provide an overview of the historical events we call the Holocaust, including their pre-history and aftermath. This information will provide the necessary background for discussing some of the questions that have occupied the fields of philosophy, literature, aesthetics, and ethics over the last sixty years. Taught in English.
  • GERMAN 3254H "Representations and Memory of the Holocaust in Film" 
    • Students will view, discuss, and examine major filmic representations of the Holocaust from several countries from the 1940s through the present. Students will learn how these films have contributed to our understanding of its events, challenged notions of social responsibility and belonging, and coped with the problem of representing something often considered unrepresentable. Taught in English.
  • GERMAN 3351 "Democracy, Fascism, and German Culture"
    • Culture and politics of three periods in German history that are relevant to today's challenges: the Weimar Republic, National Socialism & World War II, and the Cold War. Focus not just on tensions between democratic and anti-democratic political movements, but also on the ways that the opinions of ordinary citizens and ideas spread through media can (de-)stabilize democracy. Taught in English.
  • HISTORY 3002 "U.S. Political History Since 1877" 
    • History of American political institutions, ideas, and culture from Reconstruction to the present.
  • HISTORY 3014 "Gilded Age to Progressive Era, 1877-1920
    • Advanced study of U.S. social, political, cultural, foreign policy history from 1877-1920: Industrialization; immigration; urbanization; populism; Spanish-American War; progressivism; WWI.
  • HISTORY 3213 "Slavery in the Ancient World
    • Study of slavery as an institution and ideology of ancient Greece and Rome, including its importance in the ancient family, economy, and culture.
  • HISTORY 3213H "Slavery in the Ancient World
    • Study of slavery as an institution and ideology of ancient Greece and Rome, including its importance in the ancient family, economy, and culture. Honors version. 
  • HISTORY 3245 "The Age of Reformation
    • The history of the Protestant, Catholic, and Radical Reformations of 16th- and early 17th-century Europe.
  • HISTORY 3265 "20th-Century German History"
    • Exploration from 1914 to the present of German cultural, economic, political, and social history.
  • HISTORY 3351 "Intellectual and Social Movements in the Muslim World
    • Upper-level lecture/discussion course on significant intellectual and social movements in the Middle East and vicinity from the advent of Islam to the present.
  • HISTORY 3561 "Citizenship and American Military History: 1902 to the Present"
    • This course examines how uniformed service impacted Americans' conception of citizenship from the aftermath of the Spanish-American War through the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after the terrorist attack on the U.S. homeland on September 11, 2001.
  • HISTORY 3670 "Trans-National History of World War II in Europe"
    • One of three Spring prerequisite courses to the World War II Study Program’s May term in Europe. Only students accepted into the program during the October registration period may enroll. This class will deepen the contextual knowledge of students about the different national histories and the specific sites they will encounter in May.
  • HISTORY 3676 "Leadership in History"
    • This course employs the lessons, models, and narratives of history to consider different characteristics of leadership and analyze how those qualities might shape students' own vision of what it means to be an informed citizen, leader, and follower.
  • HISTORY 3680 "Religion and Law in Comparative Perspective"
    • Comparative, interdisciplinary approach to studying religion and law. Drawing on concrete cases, historical studies, and theoretical literature, the course explores how the relationship between religion and law has been configured differently in different liberal democracies, such as the U.S., France, and Israel, and what this might mean for contemporary debates. Cross-listed with RELSTDS 3680. 
  • HISTORY 3712 "Science and Society in Europe, from Newton to Hawking"
    • The history of science from the eighteenth through to the late twentieth century. Students will study major developments in the physical, geological, biological and chemical sciences, and the relation of the history of science to social, economic, political and cultural developments in European history.
  • HISTORY 5255 "Europe Since 1989: Multiple Europes after the Cold War"
    • This course explores the post-Cold War history of Europe. Students will pay attention to multiple definitions and changing understandings of Europe, teasing out the evolution in European identities in the last 30 years. Fundamentally, this is a class about what it means to be European, which allows students to learn about the multiple meanings, manifestations, and interpretations of citizenship.
  • HTHRHSC 4000 "Application of Ethical Decision Making in Health Care"
    • Participation in this course will include ongoing examination of ethical theories, bioethical principles, personal ethics, and an ethical decision-making process for application in the allied health professions. Ethics as it contributes to the definition of citizenship will be explicitly explored.
  • INTSTDS 3450 "Human Rights: An Introduction
    • Provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the conceptual history as well as the practice of human rights and its connection to global and domestic citizenship. It traces the evolution of the concept of rights, which emerges from modern revolutions and expands citizenship rights around the world, and explores how these events are connected with the emergence of global conceptions of rights.
  • INTSTDS 3350 "Introduction to Western Europe"
    • Presents an introductory overview of the historical background to modern Western Europe. It surveys the development of society & politics, as well as the evolution of art and music.
  • INTSTDS 4873 "Contemporary Religious Movements in Global Context"
    • Examination of contemporary religious movements within the context of larger political, cultural, and economic processes, including post-colonialism, modernization, and globalization. Cross-listed with RELSTDS 4873.
  • ISLAM 3201 "Muslims in America and Europe: Citizenship and Living Between Worlds"
    • What does it mean to live as modern Muslims in western societies? How do they cope with prejudice, Islamophobia, traditions, integration, war, migration, and new opportunities? We explore the experiences of religious minorities in the U.S. and Europe for Muslims whose families are originally from the Arab world, Iran, South Asia, Turkey, Southeast Asia, and Central Asia.
  • LING 3605 "Language and Social Justice"
    • This course introduces students to the role that language plays in both affording and denying citizens their rights to equal treatment and opportunity under the law.
  • MUSIC 3364 "Musical Citizenship: Activism, Advocacy and Engagement in Sound"
    • This course examines the sonic expressions of people's status, identity, rights, and duties as political subjects across multiple scales of place. We will consider the value of cultural advocacy in the public sector and social activism in the public sphere and the importance of partnering with (non)governmental institutions, community organizations, and grassroots affiliates to advance musical art. 
  • MUSIC 3364E "Musical Citizenship: Activism, Advocacy and Engagement in Sound"
    • This course examines the sonic expressions of people's status, identity, rights, and duties as political subjects across multiple scales of place. We will consider the value of cultural advocacy in the public sector and social activism in the public sphere and the importance of partnering with (non)governmental institutions, community organizations, and grassroots affiliates to advance musical art. 
  • NELC 3025 "Citizenship and Diaspora: Living in Between Countries and Cultures"
    • This course examines histories, lived experiences, and artistic representations of citizenship and diaspora. Over the course of the semester, we will focus on South Asia, specifically India/Pakistan, and the Middle East, specifically Israel/Palestine, two societies in which citizenship and diaspora have been particularly significant and complex, as well as diasporic communities in the US. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with SASIA 3025.
  • POLITSC 2120 "Follow the Science: The Politics of Health"
    • In the 20th Century, chronic conditions became the leading killers of Americans and the federal government came to play a much more expansive role in health, including the approval of treatments, regulation of harmful substances, promotion of healthy habits, and funding healthcare. Students will survey these developments and apply the resulting insights to contemporary health policy debates.
  • POLITSC 2150 "Voters and Elections"
    • Students will engage in an in-depth study of the mechanics of democracy. Students will take a close look at various forms of voting and representation around the world and examine the motivation and tactics of elite actors (candidates, reporters, interest groups, political parties, media personalities, etc.) and the voting public.
  • PSYCH 3900 "A Practical Guide to Ruling the World"
    • Contemporary and historical research research as applied to governing and the governed, including social and political psychology, behavioral economics, and more. Reading and discourse on psychological research including: flags and symbols, authoritarianism, patriotism, protests and rebellion, taxation, the media, police psychology, conspiracy theories, and immigration.
  • PUBAFRS 2120 "Public Service and Civic Engagement"
    • This course introduces students to the role an engaged citizenry plays in a democracy. Students will explore trends in civic engagement, the reasons behind these trends, and their consequences; along with issues of social equity in engagement and strategies to increase civic participation.
  • PUBAFRS 2150 "Nonprofit Organizing for Diversity and Justice"
    • The nonprofit sector is one of the primary venues in which Americans engage in citizenship behaviors, while also serving multiple roles which are central to the advancement of a well-functioning democracy. Through a combination of readings, writings, dialogic debates, and guest speakers, students will become informed nonprofit sector stakeholders and participants.
  • PUBAFRS 3210 "Civics, the Making of Law, and the Development and Implementation of Public Policy"
    • This course is an introduction to the range of topics that exists at the intersection of civics, public policy, and law. It provides a grounding in the operation of the three branches of American government and the complexities of their interrelationships, as well as the democratic challenge of organizing them for the promotion of the common good and the advancement of a just & equitable society. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. 
  • RELSTDS 3678 "Religion and American Culture
    • Thematic approach to the intersections of religion and American culture, with attention to varied topics such as pluralism, nationalism, race, gender, sexuality, law, media, science, economics, and popular culture. 2370 recommended.
  • RELSTDS 3680 "Religion and Law in Comparative Perspective"
    • Comparative, interdisciplinary approach to studying religion and law. Drawing on concrete cases, historical studies, and theoretical literature, the course explores how the relationship between religion and law has been configured differently in different liberal democracies, such as the U.S., France, and Israel, and what this might mean for contemporary debates. Cross-listed with HISTORY 3680. 
  • RELSTDS 4873 "Contemporary Religious Movements in Global Context"
    • Examination of contemporary religious movements within the context of larger political, cultural, and economic processes, including post-colonialism, modernization, and globalization. Cross-listed with INTSTDS 4873.
  • SASIA 3025 "Citizenship and Diaspora: Living in Between Countries and Cultures"
    • This course examines histories, lived experiences, and artistic representations of citizenship and diaspora. Over the course of the semester, we will focus on South Asia, specifically India/Pakistan, and the Middle East, specifically Israel/Palestine, two societies in which citizenship and diaspora have been particularly significant and complex, as well as diasporic communities in the US. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with NELC 3025.
  • SASIA 3220 "Citizenship in South Asia"
    • By way of examining literature, historical accounts, primary writings from known historical figures, and contemporary Indian film, this course engages students with a look at how citizenship is imagined in nation states, how it was imagined in colonial India, and how it is manifest in post-colonial South Asia.
  • SASIA 3625 "Understanding Bollywood, knowing India: Hindi Cinema since 1960
    • Explores life in India from the lens of Hindi language cinema. Course engages with social class, gender, sexuality, Indian diaspora in the West, family structure, marriage, politics, caste, language (special focus on multilingualism in India), religion, and globalization, and how these relate to lived experiences of people in Indian society. Not for Film Studies credit.
  • SLAVIC 3320 "Queer Comrades: Sexual Citizenship and LGBTQ Lives in Eastern Europe"
    • Through the lens of film, literature, theater, and art, this course explores what it means to be a queer citizen of Eastern Europe. Countering ideas of inherent backwardness, which tend to erase the existence of a diverse group of people, we will get to know works of art that bear witness to the wealth of queer experiences in 20th-century Eastern Europe.
  • SOCIOL 3200 "Sociology of Immigration
    • Provides a sociological understanding of contemporary migration both globally and with a particular focus on the U.S. The course will examine why migration occurs; how it is sustained over time; and how immigrants are incorporated into the host society. Social relations as central to understanding immigration will be a focus of the course.
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  • AFAMAST 2367.07S "Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus
    • This service-learning course focuses on collecting and preserving literacy narratives of Columbus-area Black communities. Through engagement with community partners, students refine skills in research, analysis, and composition; students synthesize information, create arguments about discursive/visual/cultural artifacts, and reflect on the literacy and life-history narratives of Black Columbus. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Service Learning. Cross-listed with ENGLISH 2367.07S. 
  • AFAMAST 3260 "Global Black Cultural Movements"
    • This course focuses on hemispheric studies in the Americas, examining black cultural movements emerging after emancipation through the present. It considers the ways people of African descent in the Americas have used cultural productions--literature, poetry, film, music, visual art, and performance--to construct identities; agitate for equality; and understand aesthetics as political and beautiful.
  • AFAMAST 3310 "Global Perspectives on the African Diaspora" 
    • Study of historical processes, key figures and ideas, and cultural expressions of the worldwide dispersion of people of African descent from different times and places.
  • AGRCOMM 2330 "Public Perceptions of Agricultural and Environmental Issues"
    • Students will explore vital issues in food, agricultural, and environmental sciences and be exposed to methods to critically evaluate, effectively communicate, and influence decisions made about these issues. They will engage with issue stakeholders and investigate the impacts that their varying perceptions have on the food system, the environment, and society. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Research & Creative Inquiry.
  • ANTHROP 3623 "Environmental Anthropology
    • Theory and ethnographic examples of human-environment interactions, focusing on the role of culture and behavior in environmental adaptation.
  • ARABIC 3702 "Place, Space, and Migration in Modern Arabic Literature and Film"
    • This course on modern Arabic literature and culture in translation focuses on questions of belonging, relationship to space, and migration. It examines how Arabic literary narratives, films, documentaries, and other arts have imagined modes of belonging to spaces such as cities and nations, the natural world (and even the universe!) from the early postcolonial period to the present.
  • COMM 2331 "Strategic Communication Principles"
    • ​​​​​​​The role of strategic communication in business, including basic principles of integrated marketing, theory, and ethical standards.
  • EARTHSC 2206 "Principles of Oceanography"
    • Introduction to the four basic disciplines of oceanography: biological, geological, chemical, and physical. Relevance of oceanography in contemporary issues.
  • EDUTL 3101 "Playing Our Way Into Learning"
    • Playing is at the heart of being human. In this course we'll play together as we explore the significance of theories and practices of playful learning and teaching in informal as well as formal settings.
  • ENGLISH 2367.05 "Writing About the U.S. Folk Experience"
    • Concepts of American folklore and ethnography; folk groups, tradition, and fieldwork methodology; how these contribute to the development of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills in the context of lived environments.
  • ENGLISH 2367.07S "Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus
    • This service-learning course focuses on collecting and preserving literacy narratives of Columbus-area Black communities. Through engagement with community partners, students refine skills in research, analysis, and composition; students synthesize information, create arguments about discursive/visual/cultural artifacts, and reflect on the literacy and life-history narratives of Black Columbus. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Service Learning. Cross-listed with AFAMAST 2367.07S. 
  • ENGLISH 3360 "Ecopoetics
    • 'Ecopoetics' is a thematic literature course focused on interpretation and analysis of literary texts that represent interactions between humans and the natural world within specific cultural and historical settings, through a contextual examination of how human activity has impacted the environment, how social and natural systems interact, and the long-term impact of human choices.
  • ENR 3500 "Community, Environment, and Development"
    • Social change related to natural resource and environmental issues. Includes a focus on community-level initiatives, environmental social movements, and issues of environmental justice.
  • FRENCH 2803.01 "Paris" 
    • Exploration of the lived environment of the city of Paris through the study of its history, geography, population, and cultural production, including but not limited to art, architecture, cinema, literature, and fashion.
  • FRIT 3061 "Mediterranean Food Cultures
    • This course approaches food as a way of talking about culture and identity in an ever-changing world of human and environmental interactions. Through the study of literature, film, music, and social media, it explores how the lived environments of the regions surrounding the Mediterranean Sea have shaped and continue to shape their cuisines and thus their cultural identities.
  • GEOG 2500 "Cities and their Global Spaces"
    • Globalization and urbanization; urban economies, spaces, and societies; function, form, and pattern in developed and developing world cities.
  • GEOG 3800 "Geographical Perspectives on Environment and Society"
    • Geographical understanding of interactions between society and environment; how historical and contemporary views of the environment influence people's actions toward the environment and other people.
  • GERMAN 3352 "The Development of Contemporary Dresden"
    • Investigation of German life and culture, past and present, through an exploration of the city of Dresden and surroundings; summer study abroad course with first-hand experience of German culture. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Education Abroad & Away.
  • GERMAN 3689 "Words Across The World"
    • Language, at the heart of our social life, drives much of what humans do: converse, convey beliefs and views, label, categorize, include and exclude people. We'll critically examine how we use language to interact with our lived environments (LE); analyze and discover ways in which words are used and manipulated to impact our LE; and how changes and developments in our LE can have a direct effect on language. Cross-listed with NELC 3689 & SPANISH 3689.
  • HISTART 3905 "The Developing World on Screen"
    • Exploration of the relationships between the lived environments of the developing world and their representations in film. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with INTSTDS 3905.
  • HISTORY 2701 "History of Technology
    • Survey of the history of technology in global context from ancient times.
  • HTHRHSC 4700 "Global Aging
    • Study of health and well-being of older adults in developed and developing countries and immigrant communities with the exploration of impact and requirements within the lived environment.
  • INTSTDS 3905 "The Developing World on Screen"
    • Exploration of the relationships between the lived environments of the developing world and their representations in film. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with HISTART 3905.
  • KNOW 2310 "Seeing and Making"
    • Introduction to the design of the physical environment through direct experience and practices of making, including urban walks, drawing and physical model making. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Research & Creative Inquiry.
  • LING 3803 "Ethics of Language Technology"
    • Students will learn about how language processing systems are created, and at what
      steps in the process bias and unfairness might creep in. They will learn about efforts to define, detect and quantify bias, and how different ethical principles can lead to different results. Finally, students will discuss different ways to remedy the ethical problems of language technology.
  • MUSIC 3352 "Soundscapes of Ohio"
    • This course examines the historical and present-day sonic lived environment of Central Ohio. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Research & Creative Inquiry.
  • NELC 3689 "Words Across The World"
    • Language, at the heart of our social life, drives much of what humans do: converse, convey beliefs and views, label, categorize, include and exclude people. We'll critically examine how we use language to interact with our lived environments (LE); analyze and discover ways in which words are used and manipulated to impact our LE; and how changes and developments in our LE can have a direct effect on language. Cross-listed with GERMAN 3689 & SPANISH 3689.
  • PUBHLTH 3310 "Current Issues in Global Environmental Health"
    • Fundamental concepts and principles of environmental health are presented through a critical review and discussion of current issues in global environmental health.
  • SPANISH 3689 "Words Across The World"
    • Language, at the heart of our social life, drives much of what humans do: converse, convey beliefs and views, label, categorize, include and exclude people. We'll critically examine how we use language to interact with our lived environments (LE); analyze and discover ways in which words are used and manipulated to impact our LE; and how changes and developments in our LE can have a direct effect on language. Cross-listed with GERMAN 3689 & NELC 3689.
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  • ANTHROP 3050 "Social and Ecological Systems: From Problems to Prospects
    • This high-impact research course surveys the diverse past, present, and future of human-environment relationships. Students will investigate key contemporary issues, discover their cultural and historical causes, and explore how constructive solutions can be achieved. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Research & Creative Inquiry.
  • ANTHROP 3623 "Environmental Anthropology
    • Theory and ethnographic examples of human-environment interactions, focusing on the role of culture and behavior in environmental adaptation.
  • ANTHROP 4597.03H "The Prehistory of Environment and Climate
    • History of modern biotic communities, biological evidence of climatic change during the late glacial and Holocene, and exploration of the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to climatic functions.
  • CIVILEN 3530 "Learning From Disasters: Extreme Events and Their Impact on Infrastructure, Engineering, and Society"
    • Introduction to six dimensions of sustainability while learning the main impacts and threats caused by various extreme events through the study of academic publications and reports covering six major extreme events. Long term impacts and recovery from extreme events, how historical decisions in planning, engineering and/or urban development, legislation play important roles. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with EARTHSC 3530.
  • COMPSTD 4420 "Cultural Food Systems and Sustainability"
    • Considering food as both a material good and marker of individual or collective identity, this interdisciplinary course asks students to think reflexively of how food and foodways (i.e., socio-cultural practices related to food production and consumption) are being transformed amid changing lived environments at various scales. This course includes a required agricultural experiential component.
  • CRPLAN 3210 "Sustainable Urban Planning Policy and Practice"
    • This is an undergraduate course on sustainable urban planning policy and practice. The course has been designed to provide theory and practice based experiences regarding the concept of sustainable development as it relates to planning. The focus of the course will be on the relationship between land use planning and sustainable development, although other planning subjects will be addressed.
  • EARTHSC 3530 "Learning From Disasters: Extreme Events and Their Impact on Infrastructure, Engineering, and Society"
    • Introduction to six dimensions of sustainability while learning the main impacts and threats caused by various extreme events through the study of academic publications and reports covering six major extreme events. Long term impacts and recovery from extreme events, how historical decisions in planning, engineering and/or urban development, legislation play important roles. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with CIVILEN 3530.
  • ENGLISH 3020 "Writing About Sustainability"
    • This course asks students to consider their place in the natural world by conducting primary and secondary research, analyzing data, composing and revising written arguments, and becoming more proficient with the conventions of academic discourses. We will employ rhetorical theory as one approach to engage in advanced, in-depth, and scholarly investigations about sustainability.
  • ENGLISH 3340 "Reimagining Climate Change"
    • The course focuses on literature and media (fiction, non-fiction, film, video games, comics) that discuss the broad issue of climate change and the long relationship between humans and the environment.
  • ENR 3200 "Environmental and Natural Resources Policy"
    • This course covers topics such as the constitutional foundations of environmental policy, the role of congress and the executive branch in designing policy and bureaucratic agencies in implementing them, and the courts system as the final arbiter for environmental disputes. It also covers some of the foundational legislation in the U.S. to protect the environment and advance sustainability.
  • ENR 3400 "Psychology of Environmental Problems"
    • The theory and psychology behind individual and group behavior as it relates to environmental problems.
  • FABENG 3210 + 3211 "Introduction to Humanitarian Engineering"
    • This course will introduce students to the field of Humanitarian Engineering, cover a variety of potential career paths in this field, explore engineering equations as they apply to problem solving in low-resource settings, introduce students to reflection and communication skills for working as engineers in sustainable development and discuss cultural constraints for engineering problems. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching.
  • FABENG 3400.01 "Sustainability of the Food Supply Chain"
    • Sustainability of the food supply chain depends on the efficiency of transforming raw food materials into consumer food products. This course introduces key operations in each sector of the supply chain along with sustainability parameters, focusing on energy, water, and waste. Students will recognize the challenges of maintaining a sustainable food supply while minimizing environmental impact. Cross-listed with FDSCTE 3400.01. 
  • FDSCTE 3110 "Alternative Packaging for a Greener Environment"
    • This Sustainability course focuses on the dependence of humans on earth and environmental systems through the lens of alternative packaging. Plastic packaging accounts for >30% of global plastic consumption. Sustainable alternatives to current packaging methods are urgently needed. This course addresses sustainability through the dimensions of engineering, technology, and design. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice:  Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching.
  • FDSCTE 3400.01 "Sustainability of the Food Supply Chain"
    • Sustainability of the food supply chain depends on the efficiency of transforming raw food materials into consumer food products. This course introduces key operations in each sector of the supply chain along with sustainability parameters, focusing on energy, water, and waste. Students will recognize the challenges of maintaining a sustainable food supply while minimizing environmental impact. Cross-listed with FABENG 3400.01.
  • GEOG 3755 "Geography of the European Union and the Challenges of Sustainability"
    • Study abroad in Cyprus. Geographic factors in the economic, social, and political progress of European integration; major problems of the area in the light of their geographic background. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Education Abroad & Away.
  • GEOG 3801 "Political Ecology"
    • Introduces students to a geographical school of nature-society thought. It situates PE in the hundred years of geographic thought on nature-society relations prior to PE's emergence in the 1970s, and follows how the field developed since then.
  • HCS 2204 "Ecology of Managed Plant Systems"
    • Origin, diversification, and biogeography of plants inhabiting managed landscapes.
  • HISTORY 2702 "Food in World History"
    • Survey of the history of food, drink, diet and nutrition in a global context.
  • HISTORY 2711 "History of Nuclear Energy"
    • Nuclear energy has been vaunted as a sustainable energy source yet remains a controversial part of the world's energy matrix today. This course will historicize its development from the product of WWII scientific tests to the promise of limitless energy in the 1960s and 1970s, to the infamous catastrophes of Chernobyl and Fukushima, to present day advances and climate change issues.
  • PHILOS 2342 "Environmental Ethics
    • Examination of the moral issues generated by the impact of human beings on the natural environment.
  • PLNTPTH 4321 "Managing Biological Invasions for Forest Sustainability"
    • Explores the causes and consequences of, and management options for, biological invasions of forest environments by pathogens and insect pests that lead to widespread tree mortality. These invasions contribute to ecosystem degradation, with ecological and socio-economic impacts and implications for the sustainability of forest ecosystems, industries, and the beings that depend on them.
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  • AFAMAST 5650 "Blackness and the Body in Science and Medicine"
    • This course considers the need for and pursuit of social justice when black bodies are subjected to commodification and systemic subordination. The course focuses on what Frantz Fanon called the “corporeal schema” of blackness as well as the social construction of blackness to think about the relationship between black bodies and social justice pursuits in medicine and science.
  • ANTHROP 3302 "Introduction to Medical Anthropology"
    • Relationship of anthropology to the art and science of medicine.
  • ANTHROP 5602 "Women's Health in Global Perspective"
    • A cross-cultural comparison of the political, economic, social, and biological issues surrounding women's health
  • ANTHROP 5700 "Anthropology, Public Health, and Human Rights"
    • This course provides an introduction to the relationship between medical anthropology and global public health with an emphasis on social justice and health as a human right. Health policy, evidence-based medicine, children’s health, HIV, TB, chronic disease, citizenship and deservingness, and other health topics will be discussed and analyzed from a cross-cultural and ethnographic perspective.
  • ANTHROP 5702 "Anthropology in/of the Clinic"
    • Investigates how health systems are products of historical, socio-political, and economic forces. Explores how anthropological perspectives, concepts and ethnography can be practiced in clinical settings to facilitate culturally competent care, inform public policy and programs, and reduce health disparities. An ideal course for students pursuing careers in healthcare related professions.
  • BIOLOGY 2105 "Human Biology in Cinema"
    • Human Biology in Cinema will explore biological insights related to human health and wellbeing through the lens of mainstream films. These biological insights will enhance comprehension and appreciation of films and in turn the films will provide a narrative structure that make the information more accessible and memorable. Films will serve as a starting point for a class discussion each week.
  • COMM 3442 "Violence in Society and Violence in the Media"
    • This course examines the causes, consequences, and solutions to human aggression and violence. It discusses how aggression and violence are defined and measured, aggression theories, individual risk factors, contextual risk factors, protective factors, and aggression targets. It examines in detail violent media research. It also discusses how to reduce anger, aggression, and violent media effects.
  • COMM 4736 "Health Communication in Interpersonal Contexts"
    • Study of communication relevant to health care in various face-to-face contexts.
  • COMM 4737 "Health Communication in Mass Mediated Contexts"
    • Overview of theory and research related to the role of mass media as they affect the public's health behavior.
  • ENGLISH 2277 "Introduction to Disability Studies"
    • Foundational concepts and issues in disability studies; introduction to the sociopolitical models of disability.
  • ENGLISH 3031 "Rhetorics of Health, Illness, and Wellness
    • Students examine rhetorical concepts and how rhetorical devices construct our understanding of our bodies, health and wellness. Students learn how power structures and ideologies enable commonplace rhetorical devices to structure normative beliefs about bodies, health, and wellness and how rhetoric shapes perceptions of health and wellness and makes and unmakes healthy bodies, including your own.
  • ENGLISH 3264 "Monsters Without and Within
    • Storytellers have long used monsters not only to frighten us but also to jolt us into thinking deeply about ourselves, others, and the world we live in. This course examines how various horror genres use monsters to explore issues of wellbeing and citizenship, and debates about race, gender, sexual orientation, mental health, social justice, and personal responsibility.
  • FDSCTE 2300 "Role of Food Science in Human Health"
    • This course explores the role of food in an individual's health by addressing mainstream controversies. Students will have an understanding of food supply chain, food components, food safety, food processing, food additives, labeling, food laws and regulations and their impact on ensuring a safe food supply and protecting consumer's health.
  • FDSCTE 4597.01 "Alcohol and Society"
    • The historical, nutritional, medical, social, technical, and economic aspects of the use of beverage and industrial alcohol.
  • HISTORY 2703 "History of Public Health, Medicine, and Disease
    • Survey of the history of public health, disease and medicine in a global context.
  • HISTORY 3708 "Vaccines: A Global History"
    • This course examines the history and biology of vaccines. We explore the discovery and development of vaccines, along with the political and cultural controversies that have surrounded them for centuries. Team-taught course with faculty member in Pharmacy. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with PHR 3708.
  • HTHRHSC 3400 "Introduction to Health Promotion and Disease Prevention"
    • An introduction to health promotion with an emphasis on the issues and factors that impact and influence health of individuals, groups and societies demonstrating the role of disciplinary research on identifying and addressing issues of health and health promotion.
  • HW 2102 "Optimizing Personal Health, Happiness, & Wellbeing"
    • Application of evidence-based concepts and strategies to manage stress through cognitive-behavioral skills building. Strengthen resiliency, set goals, problem solve and engage in healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal health, happiness and well-being.
  • MUSIC 2032S "Drumming for Wellness"
    • Students will learn research, theories, skills, and techniques relevant to the use of music in settings in which the focus is to assist in the rehabilitation, treatment, or well-being of people with motor disorders and their caregivers. Course will not count as an elective for music degree programs. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Service Learning.
  • MUSIC 3010 "Public Health and Opera"
    • This course explores six public health themes that are dramatized in opera as a popular artistic medium. Students will be introduced to the public health aspects of the issue and then presented with information about how the issue has been represented in multiple operas, ranging from the 1700s to current day. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with PUBHLTH 3010. 
  • NURSING 3798 "Nursing Study Tour Cyprus"
    • Provides an introduction to global health, well-being and sustainability concepts, examining the blueprint to transform our world through the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Examination of how current and historical human and natural systems impact well-being. Comparison of approaches in Cyprus and the US for addressing some of the most pressing health issues of young adults. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Education Abroad & Away.
  • PHILOS 2456 "Philosophy of Sport"
    • What is sport? How are sports similar to, and different from, games and arts? What can philosophical analysis add to scientific findings about sporting performance? What, if any, contribution does playing and/or watching sports make to a good, happy, and/or meaningful life? This course explores the nature of sport as a human activity and the value of sport; its role in well-being in particular.
  • PHILOS 2465 "Death and the Meaning of Life"
    • Explore the question of whether there is a relationship between mortality and a meaningful life.
  • PHILOS 3430 "The Philosophy of Sex and Love"
    • This course will explore both historical and contemporary philosophical perspectives on both sex and love, and the many ways in which sex and love are integral to human health and well-being.
  • PHR 2400.01 "Addicting Drugs: Effects, Introductory Neurobiology, and Regulation"
    • Overview of effects, regulation, and mechanism of action of addicting drugs, with an introduction to function of the nervous system and how this function is altered by drugs.
  • PHR 2410 "Drugstore Science"
    • This course introduces the science behind common drugstore products, including over-the-counter (OTC) medications and drug-cosmetics, including how these products work, potential non-drug alternatives, and various drug-related issues involving their use. Note: Content of this course is not intended to be considered as professional medical advice or to replace advice from a healthcare provider.
  • PHR 3708 "Vaccines: A Global History" 
    • This course examines the history and biology of vaccines. We explore the discovery and development of vaccines, along with the political and cultural controversies that have surrounded them for centuries. Team-taught course with faculty member in History. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with HISTORY 3708.
  • POLITSC 2120 "Follow the Science: The Politics of Health"
    • In the 20th Century, chronic conditions became the leading killers of Americans and the federal government came to play a much more expansive role in health, including the approval of treatments, regulation of harmful substances, promotion of healthy habits, and funding healthcare. Students will survey these developments and apply the resulting insights to contemporary health policy debates.
  • PUBHEPI 2410 "Epidemiology in Public Health
    • The course will cover the principles and procedures in the field of epidemiology, with a focus on the application of the principles of epidemiology.
  • PUBHLTH 2010 "Critical Issues in Global Public Health"
    • Public health concepts examining the philosophy, purpose, history, organization, functions, and results of public health practices domestically and internationally. Presents the pressing global public health concerns of the 21st century.
  • PUBHLTH 2010H "Honors Critical Issues in Global Public Health
    • Critical Issues Global Public Health presents global public health practice and research, examining the philosophy, purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities, and results of public health practice at the global, national, state, and local levels.
  • PUBHLTH 3010 "Public Health and Opera"
    • This course explores six public health themes that are dramatized in opera as a popular artistic medium. Students will be introduced to the public health aspects of the issue and then presented with information about how the issue has been represented in multiple operas, ranging from the 1700s to current day. Approved as a 4-credit-hour High-Impact Practice: Interdisciplinary Team-Teaching. Cross-listed with MUSIC 3010. 
  • SOCIOL 3630 "Medical Sociology"
    • Sociological analysis of the distribution of disease, and the nature of health care institutions, health professions, and the delivery of health care services.
  • SOCIOL 5450 "Sociology of Global Health and Illness"
    • Sociological study of health and illness from a global perspective. Topics include health, illness, and related behaviors; disease processes; correlates of diseases; global efforts to improve health; and comparative health care systems.
  • SOCWORK 2110 "Sport and Positive Youth Development"
    • This course focuses on how characteristics of individuals, families, peer systems, schools, neighborhoods & other environmental contexts contribute to the development of social, academic, & health-related problems among youth. Students will apply the knowledge & skills of generalist practice to the design and delivery of prevention and youth development programs in sport/recreation/play settings.
  • SPHHRNG 4530 "Introduction to Autism"
    • This course provides an overview of the identification and diagnosis of autism, scientific perspectives on etiology, and the neurobiological underpinnings of autism, as well as treatment components of autism.
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  • AFAMAST 3086 "Black Women in Slavery and Freedom"
    • Traces the experiences and struggles of African American women from slavery through the Civil Rights/Black Power era. Cross-listed with HISTORY 3086.
  • AFAMAST 3370 "Being African American"
    • We examine the particular experiences of first and second generation Africans in America, for whom today's amplified "us vs. them" rhetoric threatens to fracture what W.E.B. Du Bois called an African American sense of "two-ness." What are the constraints on a doubly conscious "African" and "American" identity in the United States? What are the challenges of sustaining a fragile social pluralism?
  • AFAMAST 3376 "Arts and Cultures of Africa and the Diaspora"
    • An overview of African and African diaspora cultures from a historical perspective. Cultural media will include art, literature, film, dance and photography. Cross-listed with HISTART 3102.
  • COMPSTD 4597.03 "Global Folklore"
    • Examines contemporary folklore around the world; introduces students to key concepts in folklore scholarship; focuses on transmission and transformation of cultural knowledge and practice, particularly in situations of conflict or upheaval.
  • HISTART 3102 "Arts and Cultures of Africa and the Diaspora"
    • An overview of African and African diaspora cultures from a historical perspective. Cultural media will include art, literature, film, dance and photography. Cross-listed with AFAMAST 3376.
  • HISTORY 3070 "Native American History from European Contact to Removal, 1560-1820"
    • Major issues and events in Native American history from before the European invasion and colonization through the early 1820s.
  • HISTORY 3086 "Black Women in Slavery and Freedom"
    • Traces the experiences and struggles of African American women from slavery through the Civil Rights/Black Power era. Cross-listed with AFAMAST 3086.
  • HISTORY 3254 "Europe Since 1950"
    • Europe from Division to Unification.
  • LING 3902 "Language Endangerment and Language Death"
    • Examines language endangerment and language death to reach an understanding of the forces threatening the survival of over half of today's 6,000 languages.
  • SOCWORK 5004 "International Social Work"
    • Examines a variety of social issues through a global perspective in order to fully appreciate the role of culturally diverse and country-specific responses to social problems.
  • SOCWORK 5005 "Human Trafficking: Domestic and Global Perspectives"
    • Provides a comprehensive understanding of domestic and global human trafficking by examining the causes and economics of human trafficking from a social work perspective.
  • SOCWORK 5030 "Global Social Work Perspectives on Poverty and Inequality"
    • This course examines the nature and dimensions of poverty and inequality in the U.S. and across the world, considers individual and social consequences of poverty, and examines historic and contemporary approaches to ameliorating poverty including review of major poverty and social welfare policy and programs. Focuses on helping students understand why poverty matters to social workers.
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  • LING 4052 "Linguistics and the Scientific Method"
    • Provides a strong grounding in fundamental principles of scientific reasoning illustrated through concrete examples across the Natural and Social sciences with emphasis on Psychology and Linguistics. This course is suitable for students from all backgrounds including non-science majors. Students will gain understanding of what it means to "do science."
  • PHILOS 2650 "Introduction to the Philosophy of Science"
    • A survey of the main philosophical problems relating to the natural sciences.
  • PHILOS 2660 "Metaphysics, Religion, and Magic in the Scientific Revolution"
    • A philosophical examination and critical exploration of the interconnection between the natural scientific, religious and magical traditions in the emergence of the Scientific Revolution.
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  • AFAMAST 3230 "Black Women: Culture and Politics"
    • Examination of the social, cultural, political, economic, and historical forces, dynamics, and processes affecting women throughout the Africana world.
  • AFAMAST 4342 "Religion, Meaning, and Knowledge in Africa and its Diaspora"
    • While the practice of religion in Africa is as diverse as its people, three major belief systems define the practice: African Traditional Religion, Islam, and Christianity. This course will examine classical and contemporary definitions of African Traditional Religion/s and the introduction and adaptations of Islam and Christianity in Africa, as well as religious practices in the African Diaspora.
  • ANTHROP 3452 "Archaeology of the Pacific Islands
    • Introduces the prehistory of the Pacific Islands from an archaeological perspective. It emphasizes voyaging, colonization, and the emergence of cultural complexity.
  • HISTORY 3227 "Gnostics and Other Early Christian Heresies"
    • Examines the early Christian philosophical movement known as 'the Gnostics' whose beliefs, based on the stories of the Bible, Platonist philosophy, and the new revelation of Jesus, shocked other Christians.
  • HISTORY 3229 "History of Early Christianity"
    • A survey of the history of Christianity from its Jewish and Greco-Roman roots to the late sixth century.
  • HISTORY 3245 "The Age of Reformation"
    • The history of the Protestant, Catholic, and Radical Reformations of 16th- and early 17th-century Europe.
  • PHILOS 3210 "History of Ancient Philosophy"
    • Major figures and issues in Greek philosophy: presocratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle.
  • RELSTDS 3672 "Native American Religions"
    • Comparative survey of indigenous religions of North America; patterns and diversity in religious experience, cosmologies, myths, rituals, social organizations, and sacred roles. RELSTDS 2370 recommended.